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20th Annual Endangered Species Faire - May 1999

The weather couldn’t have been any better on May 1st, the day of the 20th Annual Endangered Species

Anne Crowder, the One Heart Ceremony producer.

Anne Crowder, the One Heart Ceremony producer.

Maggie Berry leads the One Heart Ceremony Water puppet

Maggie Berry leads the One Heart Ceremony Water puppet.

The One Heart Ceremony Air puppet.

The One Heart Ceremony Air puppet.

One Heart Ceremony dancers accompanying the Earth puppet.

One Heart Ceremony dancers accompanying the Earth puppet.

Children hold a boa constrictor

Children hold a boa constrictor.

Barbie of Wild Things holds a vervet monkey

Barbie of Wild Things holds a vervet monkey.

A Wild Things owl.

A Wild Things owl.

Walkin' Jim Stoltz.

Walkin' Jim Stoltz.

Faire.

There was a huge turnout of approximately 8,000 people throughout the day. This was a special celebration as not many events last and are successful for as many years as the Endangered Species Faire. The highlight of the show was the One Heart Ceremony produced by Anne Crowder. Four twenty foot puppets representing earth, water, air and fire showed the interconnectivness of all forces of nature. The crowd was excited and joined in the fun and dancing.

Wild Things, a nonprofit educational group, gave two great presentations during the day that included a boa constrictor, an African vervet monkey and even some hissing cock roaches from Madagascar. The terrific line up of musical performances included String Nation, Wings of Swing, Planet Mechanics, Local World, Bill Oliver, and Walkin’ Jim Stoltz. Many thanks to all the performers who helped, make this year’s faire such a great event.

The school, agency and nonprofit organization booths were educational for adults as well as children, and many had great activities for the Faire visitors. Special thanks to all the booth participants for all your hard work—the displays were especially colorful and interesting.

Visitors to the Montessori Elementary School booth learned about wetlands and answered questions on a wetland trivia board. The children made a presentation to visitors involving a tray with a beach area (sand), a wetland area (small piece of green carpet), and pollution (small red beads). The display showed that the wetlands were capable of absorbing most pollution and therefore help protect the environment. When the wetland was removed, there was nothing to the prevent the pollution from seeping straight into the environment and the drinking water.

The Progressive Schoolhouse teacher chose erosion as the environmental topic for the class. Students learned about the effects of erosion in the differing environments as well the differences between natural erosion and man-made erosion. They also learned ways to combat erosion through tree planting. Each student participated in the project by making displays and posters about what they learned. For visitors of the booth, they had pouches that could be painted with different environmental scenes and then filled with candy.

If you missed the faire or were unable to get your 20th Annual Endangered Species Faire commemorative T-shirt—We still have a few available for a cost of $10.00 each. If interested please call us at (530) 891-6424, or drop by the office in downtown Chico at 116 West 2nd Street, Suite #3 (between Neo Retro and Pegasus). We also have a small selection of T-shirts from past faires on special at $5.00 each.

We sincerely hope that everyone enjoyed this year’s faire and hope to see all of you at the 21st Faire next year!